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Early Childhood Center-School Year 2016-2017

"Play is the highest expression of human development."
Welcome to The One School At Temple Beth Am, Celebrating the Whole Child. We understand and respect that every child is essentially, ‘the one.’ Every child is unique. The specifics of how we nurture and grow each child are dependent entirely upon the needs of the child. This is how we celebrate each child - by engaging him or her at his or her point of need. The One School partners with every parent to ensure every child is championed and educated as an individual.

The One School is a NAEYC Accredited, Reggio Emilia Nature-inspired school, serving ages 18 months to five years. The One School offers certified teachers, a low student/teacher ratio, an emergent creative curriculum and specialty areas of study including science, art, music, foreign language and nature study. The One School’s curricula are supplemented by young family programs and parenting workshops, an infant and toddler program, Family Center, Summer Camp, after school enrichment classes and an active and instrumental Parent Teacher Organization. A commitment to contribute to the community and the world at large is also a part of the school’s social justice philosophy.






Monday, March 14, 2016

PURIM

Purim is celebrated with a public reading—usually in the synagogue—of the Book of Esther (Megillat Esther), which tells the story of the holiday. Under the rule of King Ahashverosh, Haman, the king's prime minister, plots to exterminate all of the Jews of Persia. His plan is foiled by Queen Esther and her cousin Mordechai, who ultimately save the Jews of Persia from destruction. The reading of the megillah typically is a rowdy affair, punctuated by booing and noise-making when Haman's name is read aloud.
Purim is an unusual holiday in many respects. First, Esther is the only biblical book in which God is not mentioned. Second, Purim, like Hanukkah, traditionally is viewed as a minor festival, but elevated to a major holiday as a result of the Jewish historical experience. Over the centuries, Haman became the embodiment of every anti-Semite in every land where Jews were oppressed. The significance of Purim lies not so much in how it began, but in what it has become: a thankful and joyous affirmation of Jewish survival against all odds.

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